Log’s Comic Log, week of 7/11/2018

When I first started out buying weekly comics, I gave myself two rules: 1.) I would only buy arcs with two or three back-issues instead of frantically catching up on longer stories, and 2.) I would only buy comics that were continuing on the next New Comic Book Day. That week, it happened to be Coda and Isola that fell into both of those categories. I also happened to fall in love with both of those story arcs, and since then they’ve been on the top of my list for comics that have me flipping through my calendar, double-checking when I can finally continue reading them.

Needing a third comic book to review this week, I looked at She Could Fly from Berger Books and Dark Horse Comics, and Farmhand from Image Comics as my possible choices. They both seemed promising, in fact the former of which had been advertised quite heavily in previous comic books I’ve bought. However, they are both first issues, and I knew I could really only pick one to feature as first issues tend to be pretty top-heavy, adding onto this already heavy week. Upon reading the first few pages of Farmhand, I knew I had to write about it. It’s… exciting, to say the very least, and I’ve saved it for last for that very reason.

In order, I will be discussing the following comics:

 

  • Coda #3
  • Isola #4
  • Farmhand #1

 

Coda3

Coda #3 (W) Simon Spurrier, (A/C/Cvr A) Matías Bergara, (C) Michael Doig, (Cvr B) Julian Totino Tedesco, (Cvr C) Toni Infante. Published by BOOM! Studios

The last two issues of Coda have been a fascinating hodgepodge of frantic, wiry illustration, entrancing colors, and effectively humorous writing. Hum and his foul-mouthed deadly mutant unicorn are a duo that is always such a pleasure to see gallivanting around this horrid universe created by Simon Spurrier, which is why I’m most anxious for Coda #3. In the last issue we got to see Hum’s world turned upside down. Exiled from Ridgetown for discovering one of their deepest, most disturbing secrets, landing in the refuge of a senile wizard, his unicorn crippled due to poison from eating a mutant scorpion, and discovering his current strategy to save his wife Serka as entirely useless, Hum has seemingly hit rock bottom quite early in his trajectory. With nowhere to go but up, it’s finally time to see what Hum will do next in Coda #3.

Overview

Coda #3 begins – as the previous two issues have – with a letter to Serka. Also unicorn vomit. If there’s anything Coda is successful with, it’s hooking the reader on page one. This issue hooks you and drags you until the very last page. Coda #3 is easily the most action-packed issue of Coda, and it might even be the most action-packed monthly release I’ve read in general.

Hum’s story bounces back with insurmountable force in this issue. Progress is made at breakneck speed as Hum determines himself to undo all of his misdirection, and it’s done with the illustrative prowess I’ve come to expect from this series. Coda #3 has the most magnificent spread in the series so far. It’s a sprawling graphic of a hulking giant tugging along a city-sized land-boat while being pelted by cannonballs from the defending Ridgetown, surrounded by makeshift air crafts, enormous birds, and tanks all battling one another. I try to avoid spoilers, visual or written, but that deserves describing. I was paused on this spread for at least 5 minutes. This issue has a staggering amount of visually baffling panels beyond that spread, too; bloody, colorful collages that had me laughing in amazement almost every other page. I can only imagine how fun it must have been for Bergara to render these images.

On top of this, the issue ends in a reveal so incredible that I swear my neck hurt from whiplash once I closed the back cover. I wrote the introduction for this issue’s review several days ago, and when I wrote that Hum had “nowhere to go but up,” I really didn’t know how far up that meant. Writing about any story details in this review would mean spoilers on a rather large scale. If you haven’t yet picked up Coda, I highly recommend you pick up issues 1-3. The first three issues have a concise arc on their own that’s worth it to at least get a taste of this world.

Isola4

Isola #4 (W) Brenden Fletcher & Karl Kerschl, (A) Karl Kerschl & MSASSYK, (L) Aditya Bidikar. Published by Image Comics

Isola might be the most beautiful comic series I’ve picked up since starting this whole hobby. The second half of Isola #3 took so long for me to finish because I kept gawking at almost every single panel. What’s more is the story exists within a lush universe rich with backstory, there’s so much to cling onto and dissect. In Isola #3 we were introduced to the Moro race of hybrid human/animals, hinting towards the magic (or is it?) of what may have happened to Queen Olwyn. At this point I may or may not be confused beyond recovery, but I’m still 100% along for this ride.

Overview

It seems Isola is at the point where question trading begins. Some questions are answered vaguely (maybe even not at all), while others sprout up in their place. Isola #4 is the shortest issue yet, and majority of this issue is taken up by one of the more intense and bloody action sequences seen so far in this series. For the first time I’m just a tad disappointed, but only because this arc has me so curious and wanting more after every page.

What we do get to see in this issue is more of the Moro race of hybrids. Particularly, we see a certain figure paid special attention who doesn’t speak and isn’t spoken of, but is a great source of interest for me. Scenes with the Moro still provide for some of my favorite panels in Isola, and this issue has the added bonus of getting a small visual taste of how things were before this arc began. These moments are magical, and colored in a nostalgic way which I appreciate. The universe of Isola continues to grow, which I am always on board for, however I was really hoping for just a bit more meat this time around.

Farmhand_01-1

Farmhand #1 (W/A) Rob Guillory, (C) Taylor Wells, (L, logo) Kody Chamberlain. Published by Image Comics

Starting on a new series always seems like a foolish idea when I gaze wondrously at the amount of comics I’ve managed to collect in my minor stint in the weekly comics world. Choosing to start Farmhand was a decision made, as is normally the case for a new series for me, because of the cover art and the illustrations I saw from my cursory flip-through in store. The tiny, tiny bit of information I read about Farmhand had me curious, but not yet excited. Full disclosure: I wrote this intro after having read the issue. In short and without spoiling anything, I’m glad I chose Farmhand.

Overview

Farmhand #1 is a comic that knows it’s absolutely absurd. To break out some real college-level in-class critique verbiage, there’s a lot to unpack here in this impressively ambitious debut issue. Farmhand #1 asks the question, “What if you could plant and harvest human organs?” and it answers that question with levity, for the most part. When the severity kicks in, though, it kicks hard.

I am new to Rob Guillory’s work, but the first aspect to strike me was, of course, his art style. I’m in love with how seamlessly Guillory’s characters can be depicted as caricature in one panel to stern realism in the next panel. Throughout Farmhand #1 it also benefits to pay close attention to the backgrounds. There are little bits of humor tucked away in corners for those willing to look. A few of my favorite examples include a sign in a bathroom that reads, “Wash yo stank hands,” a scientists clipboard with only one note, “ Analysis: WTF science,” and of course, a welcome brochure labelled, “Private parts.” Yes. You can grow genitals in this universe. Contrasting visual humor – and the snappy writing too – with the familial struggles and detail heavy backstory about discovering a “new type of human stem cell” allowing for the growth of human organs only amplifies both extremities of humor and serious plot.

Given all of the above, the characters of Zeke and his family, who have a surprising amount of development for issue #1, are like-able and believable off the bat. This story’s beginning is given a concise angle while also providing enough detail to fully understand the scope of this series. Essentially, this first issue accomplishes everything it needs to, and with amazing flourish to boot. Farmland #2 hits shelves on August 8th, 2018, and I already know I need a copy.

Wrap-up

Damn. I need a cigarette after this week’s releases. I don’t even smoke, I just think it’ll help.

I feel so lucky to have had a week this rich in good content for the second Log’s Comic Log. Many of these comics capture that pure joy of getting a hit of a good story, and I’m ecstatic to have Farmhand as yet another new series to keep up on. Now I just need to make sure I don’t get too overwhelmed…

That being said, next week it’s hard to say what I might want to write about. By Night #2 from BOOM! Studios is coming out, but I haven’t read the first issue that I’ve been carrying around in my bag and may or may not have forgotten about (shhhh please don’t tell shhhhh). Gideon Falls is another series continuing next week that I’m interested in, but haven’t read the 4 issues preceding this upcoming release. Jeff Lemire is a favorite of mine in the comics world, it only makes sense that I should read it. That also means purchasing and reading 4 issues by next Wednesday… As for a third comic, we’ll see! If anybody has recommendations, I’m always open to them.

Thanks for reading!

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